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Too often we see authors fail to market their book after finishing a manuscript. Marketing and promotion is a critical piece of the overall sales plan for your book. Whether it is with the support of a publisher/agent or whether you are marketing on your own efforts, authors must invest additional time and energy in promoting their book alongside those who are helping them. In this article, I will overview basic practices in marketing your book, including questions to ask your marketing team, advice for how to handle marketing on your own, and how to make this essential piece of your book project fun and manageable. I will share with you the basics of social media marketing, teach you how to write a simple press release, and provide answers to some frequently asked questions when it comes to marketing your book.

First Steps:

It is important to establish who is on your marketing team. Are you going this alone or do you have others who are helping? If you have help, it is wise to set up a team call to establish roles and timelines for marketing...

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When it comes to publishing books, you have three main options: to do it yourself and pay for services, to get picked up by a traditional publishing house who will pay you royalties and/or an advance for your writing, and independent publishing.

1.Traditional publishing

2. Self publishing (Author's services publishing)

3. Indie publishing

Traditional Publishing

This is how the traditional publishing process generally works in the non-fiction world:

  • Write your proposal and sample pages.
  • Submit those to a literary agent who takes 15% (industry standard but negotiable).
  • Once under contract with you, the agent will submit to various publishers whom they have existing relationships. You can hope to end up with an advance plus 1-2% of sales in royalties. This is current industry standard but negotiable.
  • In lieu of submitting to a literary agent, you can also submit directly to certain publishers as I did with the History Press.
  • Complete your manuscript while you’re shopping the title to...
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There is a common misconception that most food trucks would appreciate any catering opportunity. But rarely will you find a food truck who is looking for an opportunity to 'just' come sell food at an event. Why? They have established locations with regular clientele. To ask them to move their business with no guarantee of sales and an unsure amount of attendees is risky business. Below my food truck catering recommendations is a quick checklist for you to get your ducks in a row before reaching out for quotes for a food truck to come to your event.

CHECKLIST FOR HIRING A FOOD TRUCK

· Are you charging the food truck to come to your event? If so, how much?

· How many other food trucks will be allowed at the event? and will you allow 2 trucks of the same genre of food to participate?

· How many eaters will the event attract?

· How many guaranteed sales will you promise the food truck vendor? (They need to prepare food and hire staff well in advance. Many will want a guaranteed sale of $1k per event to consider coming.)

· Are you...

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